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Noctilucent Clouds and Aurora

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Displays of Noctilucent Clouds and Aurora during one night are rare. Noctilucent Clouds, NLC’s for short, (Night Shining Clouds or Polar Mesospheric Clouds) are the world’s highest types of cloud forming on the edge of space at height of about 80 km (50 miles) which is also height where auroras occur. Unlike most of other clouds types, which are mostly made of water vapour, NLCs are comprised of extremely small ice crystals. They are normally too faint to be seen, and are visible only when illuminated by sunlight from below the horizon while the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the Earth’s shadow. They

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The hidden life in pond water

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We don’t need to dive into the deep ocean to find the most unusual lifeforms. This short clip is a journey into a bizarre world of microscopic inhabitants of pond water.

You will see water fleas, bryozoans, water mites, mayfly nymphs, ostracods, and, of course, hydras. They jump, crawl, and float in a completely alien environment filled with mesmerizing algae and bushes of ciliates on stalks.

This video uses image made through a biological microscope and macro lenses, that macro work added more depth and allows seeing whole animals in a more natural environment. The average size of the animals filmed was less than 1

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Oxygen depletion in the Baltic Sea is 10 times worse than a century ago

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After several years of discussions, researchers from Aarhus University (Denmark), Lund University (Sweden) and Stockholm University (Sweden) have determined that nutrients from the land are the main cause of widespread areas of oxygen depletion. The results were published on 31 March in the prestigious American journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Nutrients are the villain

The deepest areas of the Baltic Sea have always had a low oxygen content. The inflow of fresh water is actually limited by low thresholds at the entrance to the Baltic Sea. At the same time, there is a relatively fresh layer above the denser and saltier

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Slow Life

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Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.

Learn more about what you see in my post: Microworlds Photography Inquiries/licensing/press: find my contact details here:

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New discovery finds missing hormone in birds

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University of Akron researchers discovered leptin in the mallard duck, peregrine falcon and zebra finch, marking the first time the hormone has been found in birds.

How does the Arctic tern (a sea bird) fly more than 80,000 miles in its roundtrip North Pole-to-South Pole migration? How does the Emperor penguin incubate eggs for months during the Antarctic winter without eating? How does the Rufous hummingbird, which weighs less than a nickel, migrate from British Columbia to Mexico? These physiological gymnastics would usually be influenced by leptin, the hormone that regulates body fat storage, metabolism and appetite. However, leptin has gone missing in birds –

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The Greek Legacy: How the Ancient Greeks Shaped Modern Mathematics

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Here’s an animation created in collaboration with The Royal Institution telling the tale of Ancient Greek Mathematics in just two minutes.

“2500 years ago a group of revolutionary thinkers changed the way we think about maths. Through the idea of proof, the Ancient Greeks showed that maths isn’t just about performing calculations, but a way of understanding and testing the reality of the world around us”.

The Greek Legacy: How the Ancient Greeks Shaped Modern Mathematics from 12Foot6 on Vimeo.

Computers spot false faces better than people

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A joint study by researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Toronto has found that a computer system spots real or faked expressions of pain more accurately than people can. The work, titled “Automatic Decoding of Deceptive Pain Expressions,” is published in the latest issue of Current Biology.

“The computer system managed to detect distinctive dynamic features of facial expressions that people missed,” said Marian Bartlett, research professor at UC San Diego’s Institute for Neural Computation and lead author of the study. “Human observers just aren’t very good at telling real from faked expressions of pain.”

Senior author Kang

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Permafrost Thaw Exacerbates Climate Change

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The climate is warming in the arctic at twice the rate of the rest of the globe creating a longer growing season and increased plant growth, which captures atmospheric carbon, and thawing permafrost, which releases carbon into the atmosphere. Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) Assistant Scientist Sue Natali and colleagues engineered first-of-a-kind warming experiments in the field to determine net gains or losses in carbon emissions. The study entitled “Permafrost degradation stimulates carbon loss from experimentally warmed tundra,” published in the journal Ecology found that growing season gains do not offset carbon emissions from permafrost thaw.

According to Dr. Natali, “Our results show that

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Ancient clam gardens nurture food security

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A three-year study of ancient clam gardens in the Pacific Northwest has led researchers, including three from Simon Fraser University, to make a discovery that could benefit coastal communities’ food production. PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed science journal, has just published their study.

Amy Groesbeck, an SFU alumna, SFU professors Anne Salomon, an ecologist, and Dana Lepofsky, an archaeologist, and Kirsten Rowell, a University of Washington biologist are the authors.

The researchers discovered that ancient clam gardens made by Aboriginal people produced quadruple the number of butter clams and twice the number of littleneck clams as unmodified clam beaches. This is the first study to provide

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Map of Europe 1000 AD to present with timeline

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Video of European history: a 1000 years of border changes, as empires rise and fall, take over areas, loose areas, parts gain Independence and join other areas.